fbpx

Top 6 Plants for Your Bathroom

Picture of WESTON WHOLESALE BLOG

WESTON WHOLESALE BLOG


It’s time to turn your bathroom into your own personal green oasis. Plants make the space more pleasant, add to the décor, and improve air quality. It’s also easy to water and mist your plants in a space that has a water supply close at hand. The high humidity levels of the bathroom can be the ideal environment for many houseplants. In general, you need to choose plants that thrive on humidity, can tolerate temperature fluctuations and are suited to the lighting conditions in your space.

Ferns: Most can handle the temperature fluctuations in a bathroom, and they love the humidity. Some can even be grown right in a shower stall, where they are regularly soaked. Some recommended ferns for the bathroom include Boston fern (Nephrolepis exaltata), maidenhair fern (Adiantum spp.), bird’s nest fern (Asplenium nidus), and button fern (Pellaea rotundifolia). 

Orchids: Many orchids are ideal for bathrooms that do not get too cold. Some species are planted in soil, while others are epiphytes (air plants) that absorb moisture from the air. Orchids can bloom for weeks, and since they are smallish plants, you can cluster several together for quite a show. Some prefer moderate light; others need bright light. 

Peace Lilies: They are elegant plants that require minimal care. They do best with regular watering and appreciate the humidity in the bathroom. Do not allow the soil to remain dry for extended periods of time. Peace lilies do well in limited light; however, if your plant is not flowering, it may need a slightly brighter location. When feeding, use a very diluted fertilizer mix.

Philodendrons: They are truly tropical plants that love bathroom conditions. There are varieties that vine or trail with stems as much as 20 feet long, and others that grow upright several feet. Both types are relatively easy to grow. If you water this plant too much or too little, the plant will let you know by dropping its leaves. It prefers consistently moist soil. Philodendrons need bright, indirect light; too much shade makes stems spindly. 

Croton: You will find croton plants in an assortment of colored foliage. These tropical broadleaf evergreens grow slowly, but they can get 6 feet tall and 3 feet wide, so be sure you have space for one. Croton plants need bright, but indirect light, and lots of humidity and moisture, although they do not like to sit in wet soil. Wait until the top two inches of soil are dry before watering. Reduce watering in late fall and winter. 

Air Plants: The term “air plant” refers to any of roughly 500 different species of flowering perennial plants in the Tillandsia genus, a part of the Bromeliad family. These are plants that require no soil for their roots. Instead, they extract moisture from the air, making them a perfect fit for the humid environment of a bathroom. They do best in bright, filtered light conditions. and they can thrive under fluorescent lighting. 

Adapted from articles in thespruce.com by Marie Iannotti

Share this post

Jenny and Family
Employee Spotlight

Jennifer Rolo, MCH

he phrase, ‘Grow where you are planted’ is frequently used to encourage others to be all that they were created to be, to do what’s right, even when it’s hard,

Read More »
Christmas Cactus
Plant Notes

Christmas Cactus

Holiday cactus, Thanksgiving, Christmas or Easter cactus, Zygocactus or Schlumbergera – what’s in a name?  Potentially confusion, if the naming of these cacti is anything to go by, but fortunately

Read More »
Trees
Garden Design

How Do I Light My Tree?

By Trevor Smith “There’s a light on this tree that won’t light on one side.”How the Grinch Stole Christmas Ahh, the Christmas tree. It is the center of so many

Read More »
Mistletoe
Plant Notes

Mistletoe

Mistletoe, like holly and ivy, is part of the festive décor associated with a traditional northern hemisphere holiday season, most notably the custom of kissing when standing under it. However,

Read More »